French

Which courses do I sign up for?

The course description and placement guidelines that follow should help you choose the proper gateway course given your background. If you have taken an AP, IB or SAT II test (with or without listening), you should use that score as your guide for selecting a course.

If you have this background and/or test scores:

You should take this course:

Elementary French - 100 level courses

  • You have never studied French.
  • You studied French in elementary or middle school but not in high school.
  • You studied French one year in high school.
  • You studied French two years in high school but did not have your high school courses taught in French (your teacher did not speak French on a regular basis and you were not required to speak French at least 75% of class time).
  • You have no SAT II, AP, or IB test score
  • Your SAT II score in French is in the 240-410 range.
  • If your IB score in French is below 4, contact Professor Clare Tufts.

French 101: Elementary French 1 - Introduction to the essential elements of French language and aspects of French/Francophone cultures. Open to students who have never studied French before, or to those who have not studied French more than two years in high school. Practice in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the language. Includes computer, video, and audio labs. Four class meetings a week.

OR

French 111: Intensive Elementary French - Covers the basic elementary French language curriculum (French 101-102) in one semester. Not open to students who have studied French for more than two years pre-college. Practice in understanding, speaking, readings, and writing French, and an introduction to some aspects of French/francophone cultures. Computer, video, and audio laboratory work required. French 111 is the equivalent of French 101-102, and students who complete it earn 2 credits. French 111 is offered in the Spring semester.

  • You studied French for 2 years in a very strong high school program, took the last French course your senior year, and made an A.
  • You studied French for 3 years in high school but the last year was not your senior year, or you do not think the program was strong, or you did not receive a final grade of A or high B.
  • You have an SATII score in the 420-480 range.
  • You have an IB score below 4. In this case, contact Professor Clare Tufts.
French 102: Elementary French 2 - Continues work on the essential elements of French language and aspects of culture. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing activities receive equal attention. Requires work in the language and computer laboratory. Classes conducted in French. Four class meetings a week.

Intermediate French - 200 level courses

  • You had 3 years of French in high school, with the final year being in your senior year. Your last course was not taught in English, and you did well (A or high B).
  • You had 4 years of high school French.
  • Your SAT II score is in the 490-580 range.
  • Your AP score in French is 3 (Language Test).
  • Your IB score in French is 4.

French 203: Intermediate French Language and Culture - The first half of the two-semester program of intermediate French. Review of basic grammar; introduction to second language reading as a process; emphasis on understanding the cultural implication of written and visual texts; guided writing practice. Resources include audiotapes, computer tutorials, and videotapes.

OR

French 212: Intensive Intermediate French Language and Culture - Covers the intermediate French language curriculum (French 203,204) in one semester. Increased attention grammatical variety and accuracy; guided writing practice; development of second language reading skill with increasing emphasis on critical analysis of cultural and literary texts. Resources include audiotapes, computer tutorials, videotapes, and French language websites.  Six class hours a week.

  • You have had only 3 years of study in high school, but you did extremely well and the program was very strong, you should enroll in French 204 and plan to visit a section of French 203 for the first several days, so that you can better decide which level is most appropriate.
  • You had 4 years of high school French and did well in the courses.
  • You took an AP French literature course and did very well, but didn't take the AP exam.
  • Your SAT II score is in the 590-630 range.
  • Your AP score in French is 3 (Literature Test) or 4 (Language Test).
  • Your IB score in French is 5.
French 204: Advanced Intermediate French Language and Culture - The second half of the two-semester program of intermediate French. Focus on building higher proficiency levels in all four skills. Intensive grammar review and daily reading and in-class discussion of texts of varying lengths and styles which increase in difficulty as the semester progresses. Guided essay writing on topics related to the readings and discussion.

 

Advanced French - 300 level courses

  • You have had a significant amount of French coursework (high school, middle school, and perhaps some in elementary school) and have always made high grades in the courses.
  • You have 3 or more years of French study in high school, combined with a significant non-academic exposure to the language (such as in your home environment, or through living in a francophone country).
  • You are a native speaker of French.
  • Your SAT II score is 640 or higher.
  • Your AP score in French is 4 (Literature Test) or 5 (Language & Literature)
  • Your IB score in French is 6 or 7.

French 302S: Cultural and Literacy Perspectives - Designed to give students leaving intermediate French the reading and writing skills necessary to enter 100-level courses in French studies. Cultural and literary texts introducing students to contemporary French thought, and to how cultural practices, globalization, and immigration influence the formation of a French identity. Topics include stereotypes, family life, cuisine, youth culture, sports, language, media, and politics.

French 301: Advanced French Language/Writing Workshop - Development of competence in written expression in French, with special emphasis on stylistic variations, lexical nuances, and complex grammatical structures. Practice of different forms of French rhetoric and different styles in creative, argumentative, and analytical writings through literary, journalistic, historical, and philosophical texts. Revision and rewriting, with focus on in-class analysis and critique and individual conferences.

French 303S: French for Current Affairs - Contemporary culture/civilization course on changes/controversies in France today. Sources from French media (press and TV). Current cultural, social, economic, political issues. Includes political institutions, media, religion, immigration, health and educational systems, foreign policy, France in the European Union. Equal emphasis on written/oral skills.

French 329S: French Phonetics - Theory and practice of French pronunciation, corrective phonetics, intonation, accentuation, syllabification, elision and liaison. Focus on areas of speech production in French that are generally the most difficult for native speakers of English. Comprehension, dictation, and recitation exercises; interactive video and audio activities; self-assessment tasks; and end-of-term individual improvement grade.

French 304: French Composition and Translation - Advanced Translation and Stylistics. Cultural and social difference between French and English patterns in written and oral expression. Extensive practice in translation of different types of texts. Equivalencies between French and English. Prerequisite: French 301 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

French 321S: Business and Culture in the Francophone World - Analyzes current socio-economic and cross-cultural issues to increase understanding of global marketplace. Focus on oral and written communication, business and economic practices, labor issues, case studies, and product marketing in the Francophone world. 

 

Online Resources

Fabula, la recherche en litterature - http://www.fabula.org/

Duke Libraries French and Francophone Studies Resources - http://guides.library.duke.edu/content.php?pid=18017&sid=122889

Tutoring

Students currently enrolled in the French Language Program courses at Duke University have several options for receiving out-of-class assistance. Note, tutoring is available for students who really struggle, NOT for cramming for quizzes or exams. See the schedule below.

  • French students may visit their Instructors during office hours to review material and receive individualized explanations.
  • Instructors may refer a currently enrolled student to the French Language Program tutor, which will allow the students to schedule a weekly appointment. Once referred, it is the student’s responsibility to schedule and keep appointments with the tutor. Appointments usually go between15-30 minutes. This is a free service paid for by the Office of the Dean of Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. To make an appointment, please contact Professor Karine Provot: kp68@duke.edu.
  • Students who are not having serious problems or just want to practice conversation may also sign up for Peer Tutoring with the Academic Resource Center.  This is also a free service. 
  • Students who only want/need to practice their conversation skills can also go to the French table every Wednesday at 5.30 pm in the new Penn Pavilion.

Tutoring Schedule

  Monday Tuesday

Karine Provot
kp68@duke.edu
Languages Building, Room 015/014

3:00-6:30 p.m.

9:00 a.m - 12:00 p.m.

1:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Duke Language Labs

  • 114 Languages Building (West Campus)
  • 101 Carr Building (East Campus)

Duke Global Education Office

Several programs offered through the Duke University Global Education Office for Undergraduates are jointly administered by the Department of Romance Studies, have faculty and staff participants in the programs, or involve a substantial Spanish language component. Please see the Global Education links below for the following programs:

There are also many other global education programs available that are administered by other organizations. See the Global Education Office website.

 
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Magali M. Caniot, Lecturing Fellow, French

Phone: (919) 660-3133

Full Profile »

Germain Choffart, Lecturing Fellow, French; French Cultural Advisor

Office: 015 Language Ctr

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: (919) 660-3133

Fax: 919-684-4029

Full Profile »

Laura M Florand, Lecturer, French; Coordinator, Intermediate French 204

Office: 015D Languages Building

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: 919-660-3868

Fax: 919-684-4029

Web site

Full Profile »

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Christelle M Gonthier, Lecturing Fellow, French Director of Duke in Paris

Office: 015A Languages Building

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: (919) 660-8435

Fax: 919-684-4029

Full Profile »

missing portrait

Karine Provot, Lecturing Fellow, French; French Tutor

Office: 015 Languages Building

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: (919) 660-3133

Fax: 919-684-4029

Full Profile »

Deborah S Reisinger, Lecturer, French; Director of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (CLAC) Initiative

Office: 242A Sociology-Psychology Building

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: (919) 660-2420

Fax: 919-660-2438

Office Hours: Monday 10-11, Wednesday 11:30-12:30, and (frequently) by appointment.

Web site

Full Profile »

Sandra L. Valnes Quammen, Lecturer, French; Assistant Director of the French Language Program

Office: 015B Languages Building

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: (919) 660-8436

Fax: 919-684-4029

Office Hours: Fall 2014: M/W, 12:00-1:00, and by appointment

My research focuses on second language acquisition (primarily at the elementary level) and on pedagogical applications of technology. Full Profile »

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La Table Francaise

La Table Française is a weekly conversation table which takes place in the new Penn Pavilion behind the bookstore (look for the table with a French flag). It is open to everyone in the Duke Community who would like to speak French with us! All levels welcome.

French Cine Club

The French Ciné club is back in the Spring 2014, with one movie showing a month. The film is announced every month. FREE and open to everyone so bring your friends. Movie in French with English subtitles. Some light snacks will be provided!