Spanish

The Spanish Language Program (SLP) at Duke University has designed courses to develop all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The SLP includes Elementary Spanish 101 and 102, Intermediate Spanish 203 and Advanced Intermediate Spanish 204. The 300-level courses specialize in writing, grammar, and speaking skills in the following courses: Advanced Spanish Writing 301, Advanced Spanish Grammar 302, and Introduction to Cultural Studies 303. Spanish 306-308 carry a special emphasis on cultural and social issues. Our elementary and intermediate courses are taught following a task-based second language teaching approach. The ultimate goal is to have students be able to communicate in Spanish depending on the context and specific situations they encounter in authentic or real life situations. Our advanced courses (300-level) focus both on the development of specific language skills as well as on the reflection of different thematic content.

Spanish Lecturing Fellow William Villalba plays with Orquesta K'Che at Spanish 303: Politics of Salsa's fall 2016 salsa night 

Mesa en español

Mesa en español is a Spanish conversation group that meets several times during the academic year on East campus (Marketplace). The meetings are open to all Duke students and the broader community at all levels of proficiency. All are welcome to come, share some food, and join in the casual conversation and cultural exchange in a relaxed setting that encourages interaction and discovery. Come practice your Spanish among friends and food! Bring a friend! 

Come join us for

Mesa en español

Spanish conversation practice

All levels welcome! 

Marketplace, East Campus


(downstairs coffee lobby. Look for sign)

 

The Marketplace
EAST CAMPUS

TUESDAYS

5:30-6:30pm

JAN. 31

FEB. 7, 14, 21, 28

MAR. 21, 28

APR. 4, 11, 18

 

 

For more information, please contact the Spanish Cultural Advisors: Bethzaida Fernández-Vargas, Spanish Lecturer, 2122 Campus Drive, Phone: 919-684-4346, bfv67@duke.edu or Eileen Anderson, Spanish Lecturing Fellow, 2122 Campus Drive, eileen.anderson@duke.edu.  

Sabrosura

Sabrosura is Duke's Latin dance troupe and an independent cultural establishment that retains amicable relations with its mother organization, Mi Gente. The crux of Sabrosura's mission revolves around a deep-seated desire to utilize the medium of performance art as a tool for the preservation and enhancement of multiculturalism at Duke and within the neighboring Durham community. Sabrosura specializes in a wide variety of dance forms including, but not limited to: salsa, merengue, bachata, cha cha, tango, flamenco, samba, reggaeton, lambada, and cumbia.

Website: http://dukesabrosura.weebly.com/

 

 

Tutoring

Students currently enrolled in the Spanish Language Program (SLP) courses at Duke University have several options for receiving out-of-class language skill assistance:

  1. Currently enrolled Spanish students may visit their Instructors during office hours to review material and receive individualized explanations. Office hours are listed on your Sakai site.
  2. The Instructor in a Spanish course may refer a currently enrolled student to a SLP tutor, which will allow the students to schedule a weekly appointment. Once referred, it is the student’s responsibility to contact and schedule appointments with the tutors. This is a free service. For tutoring schedules see below.
  3. Currently enrolled students may seek extra support by working with a SLP tutor on a walk-in basis. The tutor will work 15-30 minutes with the students when the tutor’s schedule permits. Review the schedule below and walk-in to see if the tutor is available at that time. This is a free service.
  4. Spanish 101-204 students may sign up for Peer Tutoring with the Academic Resource Center.  This is a free service.  
  5. All Duke students may participate in the Mesa en español: a SLP sponsored club for students who want to practice their Spanish conversation skills.

Eligibility:

  • Spanish 101-204 students are eligible for weekly 30 minute sessions with SLP course tutors
  • Spanish 203-204 students have the option for weekly 30 minute sessions with SLP writing tutors
  • Spanish 303 students are eligible for weekly 15 minute sessions with SLP course tutors
  • Spanish 300-level students are eligible for weekly 30 minute sessions with SLP writing tutors

Tutoring Schedule

Tutoring takes place at 2122 Campus Drive. To make an appointment with a tutor (or to cancel an appointment) please click on the Scheduler link below the tutor listed. 

Tutoring Schedule

SPRING 2017

1/25/17 – 4/26/1

Spring Break, March 13-17, 2017

 

Hours

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Afternoon

12:30-2:30PM
Ashley Chávez
Scheduler
Room 102

1:30-2:30PM
Maria Gutiérrez
Scheduler
Room 102

12:00-2:00PM
Ashley Chávez
Scheduler
Room 102

1:00-2:00PM
Luis Navarro
Scheduler
Room 301

1:30-2:30PM
Maria Gutiérrez
Scheduler
Room 102

12:00-2:00PM
Luis Navarro
Scheduler
Room 301

Evening

 

 

4:30-6:30pm
Silvia Serrano
Scheduler
Room 102

 

Duke Language Labs

  • 114 Languages Building (West Campus)
  • 101 Carr Building (East Campus)

Online Resources

Duke Libraries Latin American & Caribbean Studies resources 

The course description and placement guidelines that follow should help you choose the proper gateway course given your background. Be aware in particular that your records will be reviewed to verify your eligibility for Spanish 101 and Spanish 111, since you may not enroll in either of these courses if you have had more than two years of Spanish in high school. Also keep in mind that if you have taken an AP test or SAT II test (with or without listening), you should use that score as your guide for selecting a course. 

If after reading the self-placement guide you are still unsure of the best course for you; please email: Spanish@duke.edu or call: 919-684-8628 to set up a placement interview.

If you have this background and/or test scores:

You should take this course:

Elementary Courses - 100 Level Courses

  • You have two years (or less) of high school Spanish. ATTENTION: If you have 3 (or more) years of high school Spanish, you MUST enroll in Spanish 102 or above
  • You have a score of 370 or lower on the SATII
  • You did not read any texts in Spanish

Spanish 101: Elementary Spanish introduces the basic elements of the language and includes exposure to some aspects of Spanish-speaking cultures. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills receive equal attention. This course meets 5 times a week. It covers present tense, present perfect, present progressive and the morphology (forms) of the past tenses. It introduces students to Spanish-speaking cultures through readings, audio texts and other authentic materials. Students read 2 stories of about 550 words each.

Your records will be reviewed the first week of classes to verify your eligibility. If you have too much previous experience you will be dropped from Spanish 101.

  • You have completed more than two years of high school Spanish
  • You have successfully completed Spanish 101 or its equivalent at the university level
  • You have a score of 380-450 on the SATII
  • You have covered material pertaining to Spanish 101
Spanish 102: Second semester of elementary Spanish continues with the introduction of the basic elements of Spanish. This course builds on the elements of the language acquired in Elementery Spanish 101. It covers the past tenses (preterit and imperfect), past progressive, the future tense, commands and an introduction to the present subjunctive. It also studies the direct and indirect object pronouns and possessive pronouns. It exposes students to Spanish-speaking cultures through readings, audio texts and other authentic materials. Students read 2 stories of about 1000 words each. Keep in mind that the Duke in Mexico summer Program offers an intensive immersion experience to complete Spanish I and II.
  • You have never studied Spanish
  • You have maximum of one year of high school Spanish
  • You have very little contact with a Spanish-speaking environment
Spanish 111: This is an intensive course; it covers the basic elementary language curriculum (Spanish 101 and 102) in one semester, targeted to students with none or very little experience in Spanish.

Intermediate Courses - 200 Level Courses

  • You have successfully completed Spanish 102
  • You have a score of 460-580 on the SATII, or a score 3 on the AP exam (language or literature)
  • You have studied Spanish for at least 2 years in high school and have covered material pertaining to Spanish 102
Spanish 203: Spanish 203 is the third semester Spanish course. This course is for students who have successfully completed Spanish 102 or its equivalent. The course includes a complete review of elementary grammar (everything covered in Spanish 101 and 102), past subjunctive, pluperfect tenses, application of reading strategies to progressively longer authentic texts, and regular speaking practice. There is a continued development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with attention to expanding the range and complexity of grammar usage and vocabulary through exposure to Spanish-speaking cultures. Reading assignments at end of course are equivalent to a 100-150-page novel (not adapted for classroom use). Keep in mind that the Duke in Mexico summer Program offers an intensive immersion experience to complete Spanish 203 and 204.

 

  • You have successfully completed Spanish 203
  • You have a score of 590-650 on the SATII, or a score 4 on the AP language exam
  • You have studied Spanish for at least 2 years in high school and have covered material pertaining to Spanish 203
Spanish 204: This is the fourth semester Spanish course. This course is for students who have successfully completed Spanish 203 or its equivalent. Spanish 204 includes a complete review of basic intermediate level grammar, expansion of pronominal constructions, discourse connectors, and a range of conversational strategies. There is further development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. With emphasis on various writing tasks students expand their range and sophistication of grammar usage and vocabulary and exposure to Spanish-speaking cultures. Students build comprehension and produce texts of greater extension and complexity. This course prepares students for 300-level Spanish courses through literary texts and other media (film, news, short essays, cartoons, etc.). Reading assignments at the end of course are equivalent to a 150-200-page novel (not adapted for classroom use).

Advanced Courses - 300 Level Courses

  • You have completed Spanish 204 or its equivalent
  • You have a score of 660+ on the SATII, or a score 4 on the AP literature exam; or a 5 in the language AP exam
  • If you have an AP score of 5, you are encouraged to take Sp 331S
  • You have studied Spanish for at least 3 years in high school and have covered material pertaining to Spanish 204
  • You learned Spanish outside the classroom but Spanish is not your dominant language
  • You are a native speaker of Spanish and it is your dominant language-- As a native speaker of Spanish you should consider enrolling in Spanish 332 or higher. If you feel that you want either grammar or writing skill development you may consider enrolling in Spanish 301: Advanced Spanish Writing or Spanish 302: Advanced Grammar. 

Spanish 301: Advanced Spanish Writing Development of composition skills related to expository and other forms of writing, focus on techniques for organizing information, vocabulary, editing, revising, rewriting and grammatical accuracy. Substantial work on the development of writing strategies through several short papers and a final long paper. This course is strongly recommended before enrollment in literature classes in Spanish.

Spanish 302: Advanced Spanish Grammar Intended to foster students' reflection about Spanish grammar and to consolidate students' knowledge of the system of rules underlying the Spanish languages. Special attention given to grammar in oral and written communication. Not open to students who have previously taken both Spanish 301 and 303.

Spanish 303: Introduction to Cultural Studies builds effective strategies for oral communication. Use of language ranges from informal to formal situations and concrete to abstract topics. Focus on developing structured arguments and increasing linguistic accuracy. Not open to students who have previously taken both Spanish 101 and 104 or Native Speakers of Spanish.

Spanish 306: Health, Culture and the Latino Community Issues associated with access to the health care industry for growing Latino/a population in the US. Topics: cultural competency issues, medical practices, lexical knowledge related to the field. Students will engage in experiential learning through contact with teh local community. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Recommended students take one 300-level Spanish course prior to enrolling. Pre-requisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent.

Spanish 307S: Issues of Education and Immigration Community-based interaction with Durham Public Schools. Topics: Latino/a identity, access to education for immigrants, academic performance, assimilation, general pressures of family and peers, bilingualism, configurations of ethno-racial consciousness. Required 20 hours outside of class with assigned community partners. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Recommended students take one 300-level Spanish course prior to enrolling. Pre-requisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent.

Spanish 308S: Latino/a Voices in Duke, Durham, and Beyond Formation of Latino/a identity(ies) and community voices through the lens of cultural, political, and social issues at local and national level. Topics: Minority voices, power and class, linguistic and artistic expression. Required 20 hours outside of class working with the community. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, service. Recommended students take one 300-level Spanish course prior to enrolling.

Spanish 312: Community-Based Research with Spanish-Speakers Course partners with Duke faculty to assist them in implementing research projects in the Spanish-speaking community. Students will volunteer a minimum of 20 hours as interpreters, survey takers, assisting in home visits, etc. as needed. Exploration of topics related to research study such as education or health to contextualize CBR. Students will also focus on research methods, cultural competency, and linguistic skills necessary to interact with Latino/a community. Students assessed on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Pre-requisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Prior 300 level coursework recommended. Service Learning. One course.

Spanish 313: Bridging Cultures - Latino Lives and Experiences in NC Exploration of key issues surrounding Latino communities in Durham and beyond, focusing on issues of culture and immigration, health, education, economy. Assigned projects and activities will emphasize bidirectional learning and cultural understanding and facilitate opportunities for building bridges to local communities. Includes a minimum of 14 hours of community engagement with a local organization. Assessment based on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and community engagement. Pre-requisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent. Previous 300-level course recommended. One course.

 

Guidelines for Receiving Transfer Credit

Transferring a language course to Duke from another institution may involved up to three separate steps:

  1. Obtaining course credit which counts towards fulfilling th 34 courses required for graduation,
  2. Obtaining Mode of Inquiry FL (Foreign Language) coding which counts towards fulfilling your language requirement, and
  3. Determining the next language course you need to take at Duke to fulfill your language requirement (if it is not completed by the transfer course).

NOTE: Obtaining Spanish 100 (888) or Spanish 300 (999) credit toward the 34 courses required for graduation does not automatically mean the course will also receive the Mode of Inquiry FL code. Likewise, obtaining a Mode of Inquiry FL code for a transfer course does not automatically mean that you will be prepared to successfully complete a Spanish course at Duke at a higher level.

Procedure

1. Prior to taking the transfer course:

a. Familiarize yourself with the procedures for transferring a course for credit given on the Trinity Requirements web site. If you intend to request a FL coding for the transfer course in Spanish, also familiarize yourself with the requirements given in parts 2 and 3 below.

b. In order to transfer to Duke and count as one course credit toward your graduation, the first requirement is that the Spanish course must not have fewer contact hours than the equivalent course taught on campus at Duke. A Duke language course contact hour is no less than 50 minutes.

  • Minimum required contact hours:
  • Spanish 101: 70
  • Spanish 102: 70
  • Spanish 111: 112
  • Spanish 203: 42
  • Spanish 204: 42
  • Spanish 300 and above: 42

c. In addition to fulfilling the contact hour requirement, Spanish courses that are to be transferred for elective credit must meet the following specific minimum requirements:

  • All coursework and class discussion in Spanish, unless seeking course equivalency for the course in translation.
  • Substantive linguistic and cultural content.
  • Class size must not exceed 20 students.

NOTE: Student with three years or more of High School Spanish must not request transfer credit for Spanish 101. Student with more than 1 year of High School Spanish must not request transfer credit for Spanish 111.

d. Obtain a copy of the course description and any other documentation needed to show that the transfer course meets these minimum requirements.

e. Download the Transfer Course Approval Form from the T-Reqs web site and fill out the top of the form. Bring the form, the calculation for part b, and the documentation for part c to the Assistant to the DUS in Romance Studies, Mr. Dell Williams  in Languages 107. If approved, the course will be listed on the form as an elective course in Spanish. (Spanish 100 will be used to designate an elective course at the introductory or intermediate level and Spanish 300 will be used to designate an elective course at the advanced level.)

f. Take the signed form and documentation to the office of your academic dean for final approval. Upon approval, the dean will send the form to the Registrar.

2. While taking the transfer course:

If you may later want to request that the transfer course count toward fulfilling your Duke language requirement, you should save all the course materials such as the syllabus, textbooks, papers written, quizzes, exams, etc.

3. After taking the transfer course:

a. Assuming satisfactory completion of the course with a grade of C- or better, request that the Registrar of the institution you attended send a copy of your transcript to the Registrar of Duke University, Box 90054, Durham, NC, 27708. Upon receipt of your dean's approval and the transcript showing successful completion of the course, the Registrar will add the transfer course to your Duke transcript as Spanish 100 (888) or Spanish 300 (999).

b. If you want the transfer course to count toward fulfilling your Duke language requirement, you must request that the transfer course be granted the foreign language Mode of Inquiry code, FL.

  • See part c, below, for requirements for FL Mode of Inquiry credit for an elementary or intermediate Spanish course.
  • See part d, below, for requirement for FL Mode of Inquiry credit for an advanced level Spanish course (Spanish 301 or higher).

c. For a course that was approved for transfer to Duke by the DUS in Romance Studies and your academic dean with a course number of Spanish 888, the requirement for obtaining a FL code is that the transfer course must be equivalent to the corresponding Duke language course. The requirements for establishing equivalency are given below.

General requirements:

  1. Language Modalities: Speaking, writing, listening, reading, culture.
  2. Teaching Methodology: Communicative, content based approach; language use in context; use of authentic materials; use of audio and video for development of listening comprehension; regular assignments that focus on writing as a process. Cultural component integrated into teaching and assessment practices.
  3. Writing component: At least 2 formal compositions in Spanish 101, 102, 203 and 204. All composition assignments must include at least one revision stage. Length of compositions for Spanish 101 should be one page, for Spanish 102 is 1 page and 1 page and a half; Spanish 203 and Spanish 204 is 2 pages. In addition to the formal compositions, the course should include at least 4 informal writing assignments such as electronic forum, journals, etc. Emphasis on developing competency in diverse registers and text types.
  4. Evaluation: For Spanish 101-204, student should be evaluated on all language modalities: two major tests, one midterm, and comprehensive final exam; 2 oral exams.
  5. Reading: Student should be exposed to extensive reading. Adapted reading for Spanish 101, 102, and 111; original readings for Spanish 203, 204.
  6. Class size must not exceed 20 students.

Course-specific requirements:

  1. Spanish 101 must cover at least half of traditional elementary textbook (including present and past tenses, direct and indirect object pronouns).
  2. Spanish 102 must complete the study of a traditional elementary textbook (including future tenses, conditional and subjunctive moods, conjunctions, prepositions, relative pronouns).
  3. Spanish 111 must include everything covered in Spanish 101 and 102 (above)
  4. Spanish 203 must include a complete review of elementary grammar (everything covered in Spanish 101 and 102), application of reading strategies to progressively longer authentic texts, and regular speaking practice. Reading assignments at end of course must be equivalent to a 100-150 page novel (not adapted for classroom use).
  5. Spanish 204 must include a complete review of basic intermediate level grammar, discussion of a diversity of literary texts and other media (film, news, short essays, cartoons, etc.). Reading assignments at end of course must be equivalent to a 150-200 page novel (not adapted for classroom use).

d. For a course that was approved for transfer to Duke by the DUS of Romance Studies and your academic dean with a course number of Spanish 300 (999), the requirements for obtaining a FL code are given below:

  • Reading: Student in literature or culture course should be exposed to extensive reading of original (rather than adapted) texts.
  • Spanish 301 must include extensive work in advanced Spanish grammar and some stylistics. Emphasis on developing competency in diverse registers and text types through process writing. Daily writing assignments, two exams on grammar and reading topics, five compositions and a final 6-7 page paper.
  • Spanish 302 must include a study in depth of Spanish morphology and syntax. Emphasis should be given to the reflection of grammar usage in real contexts. Evaluation in this course should include at least three 3- 4 page papers on a grammar issue.
  • Spanish 303 must include extensive work in oral production. Emphasis on developing oral competency in diverse registers. Daily oral assignments, and one major presentation on a socio-cultural or socio-political aspect of any Spanish speaking country.

In addition the minimum number of contact hours, transfer course syllabus, type and amount of required work, and evaluation methods must be equivalent to those of specific Duke Spanish course for which student is seeking credit.

e. If the transfer course fulfills the requirements for the FL code given in part c or d above, download the Form for Requesting Modes of Inquiry Coding from the T-Reqs web site. Complete the form and submit it with the necessary documentation as directed on that form.

f. If the transfer course is granted a Mode of Inquiry FL code, the FL code will be added to the course on your Duke Advisement Report. (Note: Modes of Inquiry designations do not appear your transcript.)

g. A course that was approved as Spanish 300 (999) will be left unchanged on your Duke transcript; however, a course that was approved for transfer as Spanish 100 (888) will be changed on your Duke transcript to its equivalent Duke course number which means that you cannot repeat/take the equivalent Duke course to earn an additional letter grade, course credit, or FL code.

4. After receiving a Mode of Inquiry FL code for a transfer course:

a. If the FL code fulfills your language requirement in Spanish at Duke, then no further action is necessary.

b. If the FL code is not the last one you need in order to complete your language requirement in Spanish at Duke, contact the Director of the Spanish Language Program, Liliana Paredes, to schedule a placement interview. The interview will be used to determine your preparedness for the next course in the Spanish Language Program sequence.

Duke Global Education Office

Several programs offered through the Duke University Global Education Office for Undergraduates are jointly administered by the Department of Romance Studies, have faculty and staff participants in the programs, or involve a substantial Spanish language component. Please see the Global Education links below for the following programs:

There are also many other global education programs available that are administered by other organizations. See the Global Education Office website.

DukeEngage

DukeEngage provides one-time funding for Duke undergraduates who wish to pursue an immersive (minimum of eight weeks) service experience by meeting a community need locally, domestically or internationally. The program currently features multiple international programs in Spanish-speaking countries:

 

 
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Eileen M Anderson, Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Office 102, Durham, NC 27708

Full Profile »

Joan Clifford, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Dr., Room 206, Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708

Campus Box: Box 90269, Spanish Language Program, Durham, NC 27708-0257

Phone: (919) 684-0774

Full Profile »

missing portrait

Alma Coefman, Lecturing Fellow of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Dr., Durham, NC 27708

Campus Box: Box 90257, Durham, NC 27708-0257

Phone: (919) 660-3100

Full Profile »

Rebecca A Ewing, Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Office #203, Durham, NC 27708

Campus Box: 2122 Campus Dr., Durham, NC 27708

Bridging the Language-Literature Divide in University content courses: A study on the Oral Proficiency of university Spanish majors and how to improve these students oral proficiency. Full Profile »

Bethzaida Fernandez, Lecturer in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Durham, NC 27708

Campus Box: Box 90257, Durham, NC 27708-0257

Phone: (919) 684-4346

Office Hours: Spring 2016, Mondays 3 - 5pm

I teach all levels of Spanish with an emphasis on intermediate and advance level courses with core content on health and Latino/a immigration issues. My interests include second-language teaching and learning methodologies, technology in the second language classroom, community-based and service-... Full Profile »

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Ana B Fernandez Gonzalez, Lecturing Fellow of Romance Studies

Office Hours: Monday: 4:30 pm - to 5:30 and by appointment

Full Profile »

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Maria Gutierrez, Lecturing Fellow of Romance Studies

Full Profile »

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Ashley Elizabeth Hobson, Lecturing Fellow of Romance Studies

Full Profile »

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Rosa Belen Ibanez, Lecturing Fellow of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Office #301, Durham, NC 27708

Full Profile »

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Harry Karahalios, Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708-0269

Campus Box: 2122 Campus Drive, Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708-0269

Phone: (919) 660-3100

He works in contemporary peninsular Spanish and Greek literature and film, exploring the transition of both countries from the twentieth to the twenty-first century through the prisms of immigration and cultural diversity. His broader scholarly and teaching interests include theories of... Full Profile »

Lisa M. Merschel, Senior Lecturer of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708-0269

Campus Box: Box 90257, Durham, NC 27708-0257

Phone: (919) 684-8435

Office Hours: Fridays 12:30-2:30pm and by appointment.

At Duke since 2001, I teach all levels of courses in the Spanish Language Program, with task-based teaching, second-language acquisition, foreign language technologies and machine translation's impact on writing in L2 being the areas that interest me professionally. I have had the great pleasure... Full Profile »

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Joan Munné, Senior Lecturer of Romance Language

Office: Duke University, 2122 Campus Dr., Durham, NC 27708

Phone: (919) 684-4077

Full Profile »

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Luis Jose Navarro Roncero, Lecturing Fellow of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Dr. #301, Durham, NC 27708-0269

Campus Box: 2122 Campus Dr. # 301, Durham, NC 27708-0269

Phone: (919) 684-9666

Full Profile »

Maria Romero, Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Office 203, Durham, NC 27708

Full Profile »

Melissa A. Simmermeyer, Lecturer in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, 206, Durham, NC 27708-0269

Campus Box: Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708-0269

Phone: (919) 684-4877

Office Hours: Fall 2016
Tuesday, Thursday 11:25-11:55 East Duke 109 or by appointment

Full Profile »

Graciela Vidal, Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708

Campus Box: Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708

Phone: (919) 684-4294

Full Profile »

William Villalba, Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Romance Studies

Office: 2122 Campus Drive, Box 90269, Durham, NC 27708

Campus Box: Duke Box 90269, Durham, NC 27713-0269

Phone: (919) 684-4876

William J. Villalba was born in Caracas, Venezuela. He received his Licenciatura en Artes, Mención Música from the Universidad Central de Venezuela. He came to the U.S. in 1989. William received his M.A. from Emory University and his doctorate in Spanish American Literature from the University of... Full Profile »

Art project with Latino elementary students

Within the language programs in Romance Studies there are multiple opportunities for engagement in the community, the best venue for acquiring real-world linguistic and cultural knowledge. Student interaction with language communities provides occasions for developing civic engagement, cultural competence, political activism, and awareness of issues of social justice.

"Through my service experience, I have seen evidence of the themes that we have discussed in class and for me, it was a pretty heavy experience to see the topics from our readings and conversations in class occurring so close by in real life." (Spanish 307S)

Childcare during adult English classes

Currently there are service-learning courses offered in French and Spanish. These courses require a commitment of 15-20 hours of service in the community in addition to traditional class contact hours.

“I’ve become very close with the family that I was assigned,” said Madeline Thornton, a junior majoring in French and global health. “Since I’m in the area this summer, I’ve been stopping by their home to read books with the children in order to keep up their English skills while they’re out of school. I’m grateful for Dr. Reisinger and the service learning program for connecting me with some life-long friends.” (French 270T)

Refugees getting to know campus

Duke students interact with the community in many ways, such as getting to know community members during class visits and departmental events, visiting businesses in Durham, participating in international video conversations, and working alongside community members in service-learning courses. Some examples of service projects are working with refugees from Central Africa, organizing art activities for Latino/a elementary school students, and tutoring Latino/a adults in English.

"This course has been one of the most rewarding courses I have taken at Duke. I absolutely loved the component of interacting via Skype or meetings with different health organizations in Latin America. It was inspiring to talk to leaders who are actively working in an area many of us aspire to work in. A lot of time our goals feel like unattainable dreams but this course made them seem really real." (Spanish 306) 

A potluck dinner between the English students and tutors

"Learning about [my partner's] personal experience has provided me with a more complete understanding of the roadblocks, whether fiscal, social, logistical or otherwise, to adapting to life in America as a refugee," said James Johnson, a senior majoring in biology with minors in chemistry and French." (French 325S)

See how other Duke language programs participate in the Community-Based Language Initiative at http://servicelearning.duke.edu/initiatives/cbli

The Spanish Writing Studio has been created as a resource for students and instructors of Spanish in the Romance Studies Department at Duke University.  Each tab is devoted to a particular step in the writing process and contains videos, activites, tools, and other resources to help students write successfully.  

Tutors and tutoring hours are listed under the tutorías tab.  

El Estudio de escritura de español ha sido creado como un recurso para estudiantes (especialmente para Esp 203, 204, 303) e instructores de español del Departamento de Estudios Romances de la Universidad Duke. Aquí encontrará herramientas e ideas para distintos niveles de escritura.

Tutoring Schedule

Spring 2017

1/25/17 – 4/26/17

Spring Break, March 13-17 2017

 

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

2122 Campus Drive

 

Afternoon

12:30-2:30pm

Ashley Hobson

scheduler

Room 102


1:30-2:30

Mar Gutierrez

scheduler

Room 102

 

12:00-2:00pm

Ashley Hobson

scheduler

Room 102


1:00-2:00pm

Luis Navarro

scheduler

Room 301

1:30-2:30

Mar Gutierrez

scheduler

Room 102

 

12:00-2:00pm

Luis Navarro

scheduler

Room 301

2122 Campus Drive

 

Evening

 

 

4:30-6:30pm

Silvia Serrano

scheduler

Room 102

 

 

 

Escribir es un proceso y la preescritura es el primer paso. Antes de empezar a escribir, hay que pensar y reflexionar sobre el tema que vas a escoger. Para ello, se recomienda explorar y apuntar ideas iniciales. Aquí encontrarás vídeos, actividades , herramientas  tecnológicas y recursos que te ayudarán.

 Actividades | Herramientas tecnológicas | Recursos

 

Actividades

1.  Lluvia de ideas (brainstorming)- Este es un paso preliminar al acto de escribir en el que se plantean distintas posibilidades de temas y ejemplos. Una vez seleccionado el tema y la tesis, se recomienda generar mapas conceptuales o esquemas para identificar las relaciones entre las ideas y ejemplos relevantes.

2. Buscar el tema principal- Es importante crear párrafos con ideas y argumentos claros.  Abre el documento, lee el párrafo y contesta las preguntas.

3. Lista de vocabulario específico- Escribe una lista de vocabulario relacionado con el tema. Abre el documento para ver un ejemplo. 

4. Las preguntas de los periodistas- Utiliza estas preguntas para explorar lo que sabes del tema.

Herramientas tecnologicas 

  • Popplet:  Es una herramienta que permite hacer mapas conceptuales sobre ideas iniciales y explorar cómo funcionan.
  • Realtimeboard: Es un muro virtual para desarrollar la lluvia de ideas y compartirlas en proyectos grupales.
  • Padlet: Es un muro virtual para compartir ideas y imágenes con sus compañeros/as.
  • Gliffy: Es una herramienta para hacer mapas conceptuales.

Recursos

Después de hacer tu trabajo de preescritura, ya estás listo para empezar a investigar sobre el tema escogido. Es importante encontrar recursos confiables y académicos y para ello, encontrarás aquí vídeos, actividades, herramientas tecnologicas y recursos que te ayudarán.   

Actividades | Herramientas tecnológicas | Recursos

 

Actividades

1.  Fuentes fiables- Después de elegir un texto utiliza estas preguntas para saber si será un recurso útil para tu proyecto.

2. Comparando artículos-Comparen estos dos  articulos sobre el mismo tema, las pólizas de EEUU y Cuba. Contesta las siguientes preguntas. 

Artículo 1  Artículo 2

3.  Actividad de términos culturales- Esta actividad te ayudará a seleccionar tu tema de investigación o a preparar tu tema ya escogido, a la vez que prepararás el vocabulario clave.

4.  Actividad comparativa-  Una actividad para analizar distintos puntos de vista.  

 5- Investigación - Esta actividad te ayudará a analizar diferencias entre distintas representaciones de los medios periodísticos. 

Herramientas tecnológicas

  • Diigo : Diigo es una herramienta muy útil para concentrar tu investigación en un solo sitio en internet, accesible desde cualquier computadora. A la vez, permite hacer anotaciones en esos sitios Web e interactuar con esos recursos como si estuvieras trabajando en papel. Además, como Diigo archiva los sitios Web que buscas, aun cuando ya no sean accesibles en Internet, tu tendrás acceso desde diigo
  • Storify: Storify es útil para compartir noticias, ideas, trabajo con un formato agradable que permite incluir fotos, dibujos, etc.
  • Zotero: Zotero es una herramienta que te ayudará a juntar y organizar citas y compartir tus fuentes de investigación en grupos, por lo que es ideal para la escritura colaborativa.
 

Recursos

Ya estás listo para escribir sobre tu tema. Algunos elementos claves de la escritura son: la idea principal, las ideas secundarias y las expectativas de la tarea. Para escribir , necesitas entender bien el tipo de escritura asignada y sus componentes, como descripción, narración, ensayo (expositivo y argumentativo) y  trabajo de investigación. Aquí encontrarás vídeos, actividades, herramientas  tecnológicas y recursos que te ayudarán.

 Actividades | Herramientas tecnológicas | Recursos

Actividades

1. Escribir una tesis - Abre el documento para ver como escribir una tesis y hacer una actividad de identificar las diferencias entre una tesis expositiva y una argumentativa.

2. Organizar el ensayo - Mira la presentación con actividades para ayudarte organizar tu ideas.

Herramientas tecnológicas

  • Popplet:  Es una herramienta que permite hacer mapas conceptuales sobre ideas iniciales y explorar cómo funcionan.
  • Realtimeboard: Es un muro virtual para desarrollar la lluvia de ideas y compartirlas en proyectos grupales.
  • Mindmeister: Mindmeister es una herramienta que permite pasar por los distintos pasos del proceso de escritura con su Mindmapping, Collaborate (múltiples usuarios pueden trabajar juntos), Present. Además se puede usar en distintos medios: la Web, iPad, teléfonos celulares.
  • Scribble Press: Scribble Press es una plataforma para usar en iPad que permite crear, compartir y publicar historias.
  • Blogs: Tumblr, Blogger, WordPress: Con estas herramientas de blogs puedes compartir tus ideas con tus compañeros y recibir sus comentarios en un formato agradable y atractivo.

Recursos

Ya has escrito la primera versión. Debes seguir algunos pasos para revisar y mejorar tu ensayo. Hay que trabajar en la organización, la gramática y  Aquí encontrarás vídeos, actividades, herramientas  tecnológicas y recursos que te ayudarán.

 

Actividades

1. Assignment checklist- Antes de entregar tu composición/ensayo a tu profesor, asegúrate de revisar el formato y otros aspectos importantes.

__ Double-space, 12-point Times New Roman

__1-inch margins

__MLA format

__An original title

__ Required length

__ Community Standard  "I have adhered to the Duke Community Standard in completing this assignment" and sign / type your name.

___Variety of  of connectors y discourse organizers

___Spellcheck has been applied

___Accents are not handwritten /Acentos 

___ Subject / verb agreement

___ Noun / adjective agreement

 

2. Errores comunes, falsos cognados- En este documento, encontrarás una tabla con errores comunes que se deben evitar y una actividad para revisar tu uso de falsos cognados.  

 

Herramientas tecnológicas

  • Google docs: Es un programa para compartir documentos y edición colaborativa en Internet.
  • Duke’s  Box: Duke tiene ahora su propio programa para compartir documentos y editarlos colaborativamente.
  • Online Lab: Purdue ofrece instrucciones sobre distintos formatos de presentación, incluyendo MLA.
  • Easybib: Esta herramienta ayudar a formatear tus citas al formato requerido, incluyendo MLA.
  • VoiceThread: VoiceThread habilita a los estudiantes a compartir  lo que han escrito de una forma dinámica, ya que permite comentarios de lectores.
  • Calibrated Peer Review; Los estudiantes se pueden dar feedback entre sí utilizando una rúbrica diseñada a través de Calibrated Peer Review. Ideal para el trabajo de grupos de consulta.

Recursos    

Como se ha mencionado antes, la escritura es un proceso. Parte de ese proceso es revisar el trabajo de tus compañeros. Esta revisión es fundamental para recibir feedback sobre el trabajo escrito en sus comienzos. Proporcionar feedback a un compañero también ayuda a reflexionar sobre el propio trabajo escrito. Aquí encontrarás vídeos, actividades, herramientas  tecnológicas y recursos que te ayudarán.

Actividades | Herramientas tecnológicas | Recursos

 

Actividades

1. Pasos para escribir un ensayo grupal. Abre el documento para ver los paso para trabajar juntos

1. Preguntas para comentar sobre un blog de un compañero/a. 

 Herramientas tecnológicas

  • Wordpress:  Wordpress es un sitio que permite compartir tus escritos en forma de blog y ver los de tus companeros. Tiene la posibilidad de permitir comentarios de lectores.
  • Google docs: Es un programa para compartir documentos y edición colaborativa en Internet.
  • Duke’s  Box: Duke tiene ahora su propio programa para compartir documentos y editarlos colaborativamente.
  • Blogger: Blogger es otro sitio para escribir blogs y publicarlos al mundo. Contiene también una sección para comentarios.
  • VoiceThread: VoiceThread habilita a los estudiantes a compartir  lo que han escrito de una forma dinámica, ya que permite comentarios de lectores.
  • Calibrated Peer Review: Los estudiantes se pueden dar feedback entre sí utilizando una rúbrica diseñada a través de Calibrated Peer Review. Ideal para el trabajo de grupos de consulta.

 Recursos: